Upcoming Webinars Archived Webinars Training Vitals Host A Webinar About Get Updates Contact

Far UV Light Effective Against MRSA, Safe For Human Skin

XTALKS VITALS NEWS

UV Light

In order to identify the optimal wavelength that is cytotoxic to pathogens, but safe for human tissue, the researchers studied several wavelengths of UV light.

Share this!

June 10, 2016 | by Sarah Massey, M.Sc.

Tweet: UV light could be effective at killing #MRSA http://ctt.ec/xic1c+

A specific wavelength of UV light, known as far-UVC, could be effective at killing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria, without damaging the surface of the skin. As infection with drug-resistant pathogens can be a potentially life-threatening complication of surgery, the light therapy could be used to kill these bacteria and improve patient outcomes.

Despite the best efforts of hospital staff to maintain sterile operating rooms, approximately 0.5 to 10 percent of all surgical procedures results in a surgical-site infection. This means that approximately 275,000 US patients per year face a 50 percent higher post-surgery mortality rate, due to a difficult-to-treat infection.



Patients with surgical site infections also spend one week longer in the hospital, on average, compared to patients without complications. It’s estimated that this increased burden on the US healthcare system costs the country up to $10 billion in additional patient care costs.

As most attempts at treating post-surgical MRSA infections have proved to be ineffective, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center decided to investigate UV light as a possible therapeutic tool. While UV has been known to be an effective antibacterial agent, it also poses serious health risks to those who are exposed. UV light exposure to patients and medical staff can cause skin cancer and cataracts.

In order to identify the optimal wavelength that is cytotoxic to pathogens, but safe for human tissue, the researchers studied several wavelengths of UV light. Eventually, they identified far-UVC light, a specific band of UV light around 200 nanometers in wavelength, as a possible candidate.

This specific band of UV light is unable to penetrate the dead layer of skin that coats the human body, nor can it penetrate the outer layers of the eye. However, as bacterial cells are 10 to 25 times smaller than human cells, they are susceptible to damage from the far-UVC light.

The Columbia researchers previously found that the far-UVC light was just as effective as other, more-damaging UV wavelengths at killing bacterial pathogens like MRSA. They conducted further research using a 3-D cell culture model of human skin, and a hairless mouse model, and found that the far-UVC light was safe for skin exposure.

“Our findings offer a potential practical pathway towards significantly reducing surgical site infection rates without risk to the health and safety of patients and medical personnel,” said Dr. David J. Brenner, lead author of the study. Brenner and his team plan to test the far-UVC light on human patients, and eventually they hope to determine whether the light therapy could be effective at killing airborne pathogens.


Keywords: MRSA, UV Light, Cytotoxicity


| NEXT ARTICLE | MORE NEWS | BLOGS | VIDEOS | POLLS & QUIZZES | WEBINARS |

Share this with your colleagues!

MORE NEWS
Lavazza Acquires Controlling Stake in Canada’s Kicking Horse Coffee

May 26, 2017 - Italian coffee company Lavazza, has secured an 80 percent equity stake in Canadian organic and fair-trade coffee company Kicking Horse Coffee, in a deal worth CAD$215 million.

Featured In: Food News


FDA First: Keytruda Approved for Cancer Treatment Based on Biomarker Alone

May 25, 2017 - For the first time, the FDA has approved a cancer treatment for solid tumors based on the presence of a biomarker, as opposed to specifying a tissue of origin.

Featured In: Biotech News


One Year of Medically Assisted Dying in Canada

May 25, 2017 - In June of 2016, the federal government of Canada passed legislation to legalize medically assisted dying.

Featured In: Life Science News


LEAVE A COMMENT
 
  
THE XTALKS VITALS INDUSTRY BLOG

Top 5 Most Impactful Tweets in Life Sciences During the Last Week

REGISTER FOR THESE WEBINARS

EU IVD Regulation: Top Five Changes for Medical Device Manufacturers to Consider


Thermal Processing Systems for the Food Industry: A Guide to Selecting Thermal Equipment and Technology


Rare Disease & Orphan Drug Development: Cost-Efficient Trial Design to Minimize Cash Burn


eTMF Workflows: Active eTMF to Improve the Quality of Clinical Trials


Copyright © 2016-2017 Honeycomb Worldwide Inc.