Upcoming Webinars Archived Webinars Training Vitals Host A Webinar About Get Updates Contact

PepsiCo to Reduce Sugar in Over 60 Percent of Soft Drinks

XTALKS VITALS NEWS

Beverage

The move is part of the company’s plans to address the growing obesity epidemic.

Tweetables from this article:

Tweet: Pepsico to reformulate at least 2/3 of soft drinks by 2025 to be 100 calories or less http://ctt.ec/z23_3+ Pepsico to reformulate at least 2/3 of soft drinks by 2025 to be 100 calories or less.

Share this!

October 18, 2016 | by Sarah Hand, M.Sc.

PepsiCo has announced its plan to globally reduce the amount of sugar in its range of soft drinks. The move is part of the company’s plans to address the growing obesity epidemic.

Its target is to reformulate at least two thirds of its soft drinks by 2025, so that they have less than 100 calories from added sugar per 12 oz. can. Approximately 40 percent of PepsiCo’s drinks already meet those requirements.

PepsiCo and Coca-Cola have faced increased scrutiny from governments and nutrition experts who say high-sugar drinks have contributed to the increased rates of obesity and diabetes in the US. The company plans to meet its target both by reformulating existing products, and launching new zero and low-calorie beverages.



According to Mehmood Khan, PepsiCo's chief scientific officer of research and development, this new target is an improvement over their previous goal of removing 25 percent of sugars in select drinks and markets by 2020. “The science has evolved,” Khan told Reuters. “It's not just about sweeteners, it's about understanding the flavor ingredients and having proprietary knowledge and access to them.”

Earlier this month, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended that countries should start imposing a sugar tax on sweet soft drinks. While this system has already been implemented in France and Mexico in an attempt to limit consumption of the beverages, PepsiCo is in strong opposition to the tax.

PepsiCo’s nutritional goals also include reducing sodium and saturated fats in some of its snack products, by 2025. About 12 percent of the company’s $63 billion in annual revenue comes from sales of its namesake drink, Pepsi, but the bulk of their profits come from other soft drinks, along with bottled water, juices, snacks and dips.

“These are good steps. But when we have an obesity crisis, I think there is more that we can be doing,” said Mindy Lubber, president of Ceres, a non-profit organization focused on sustainability in industry. “If a food and beverage company is not looking at nutrition, they are not looking at the direction the world is going in.”


Keywords: Beverage, Obesity, Diabetes


| NEXT ARTICLE | MORE NEWS | BLOGS | VIDEOS | POLLS & QUIZZES | WEBINARS |

Share this with your colleagues!

MORE NEWS
Exclusion Criteria for Clinical Trials Poses Major Barrier to Patient Enrollment

August 17, 2017 - UT Southwestern researchers say that clinical investigators continue to increase the number of exclusion criteria, preventing more patients from participating in clinical trials.

Featured In: Clinical Trials News


Targeting Cellular Nitrogen Metabolism Could Offer a New Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer

August 17, 2017 - An enzyme involved in regulating the amount of nitrogen in the cell could be a new drug target for pancreatic cancer, according to researchers from Boston Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Featured In: Life Science News


Regeneron’s Drug for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fails in Phase III Clinical Trial

August 16, 2017 - Biotechnology company Regeneron has announced it will not continue development of its antibody drug, suptavumab, after a failure in a Phase III clinical trial.

Featured In: Clinical Trials News


LEAVE A COMMENT
 
  
THE XTALKS VITALS INDUSTRY BLOG

One Patient’s Perspective on Clinical Trials

REGISTER FOR THESE WEBINARS

Planning and Conducting Trials of the Latest Immunotherapies


ISO 13485:2016 for Medical Device Manufacturers: Ensuring a Smooth Transition through Effective Preparation


Medical Devices: Reviewing Regulatory Changes in the US and EU


Moving Beyond Regulatory and Performance Metrics in Starting Clinical Trials


Copyright © 2016-2017 Honeycomb Worldwide Inc.