Upcoming Webinars Archived Webinars Training Vitals Host A Webinar About Get Updates Contact

Your Immune System is Written in Your Genes

XTALKS VITALS NEWS

DNA

The study – which was published in the journal, Nature Communications – suggests that genes may play a bigger role in the development of the immune system than previously thought.

Share this!

January 6, 2017 | by Sarah Hand, M.Sc.

According to researchers at King’s College London, almost three quarters of a person’s immune traits are governed by their genetic information. The study – which was published in the journal, Nature Communications – suggests that genes may play a bigger role in the development of the immune system than previously thought.

The researchers used data on 497 pairs of adult female twins collected through the TwinsUK cohort. In analyzing 23,000 immune traits, the researchers found that complex immune responses – known as adaptive immune traits – which develop after a person is exposed to a specific antigen, are strongly influenced by genetics.

“Our genetic analysis resulted in some unusual findings, where adaptive immune responses, which are far more complex in nature, appear to be more influenced by variations in the genome than we had previously thought,” said Dr. Massimo Mangino, lead researcher from King's College London. “In contrast, variation in innate responses (the simple non-specific immune response) more often arose from environmental differences.”



The article also emphasizes the importance of environmental influences – such as diet, microbial exposure and infections – in childhood in developing the innate immune system. The findings could help inform future research in therapies for autoimmune diseases, including psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

“Our results surprisingly showed how most immune responses are genetic, very personalized and finely tuned,” said Professor Tim Spector, Director of the TwinsUK Registry at King's College London. “What this means is that we are likely to respond in a very individualized way to an infection such as a virus - or an allergen such as a house dust mite causing asthma. This may have big implications for future personalized therapy.”


Keywords: Immune System, Autoimmune Disease, Genetics


| NEXT ARTICLE | MORE NEWS | BLOGS | VIDEOS | POLLS & QUIZZES | WEBINARS |

Share this with your colleagues!

MORE NEWS
New PARP Inhibitor Drug Approved to Treat Women with Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

March 29, 2017 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Zejula (niraparib) as a maintenance treatment for women with certain types of recurrent cancers, including epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer.

Featured In: Pharmaceutical News


Nektar’s Opioid Analgesic Meets Endpoints in Phase III Clinical Trial

March 28, 2017 - Nektar Therapeutics has announced that their opioid analgesic has met both its primary and secondary endpoint in a recent Phase III efficacy study.

Featured In: Clinical Trials News


Small Molecule May Disrupt Biofilm Formation on Implantable Medical Devices

March 28, 2017 - Researchers at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland have identified a small molecule capable of preventing bacterial biofilms from growing on medical implants.

Featured In: Medical Device News

LEAVE A COMMENT
 
  
THE XTALKS VITALS LIFE SCIENCE BLOG

Will Pharmaceutical Serialization Solve All of Our Drug Counterfeiting Problems?

REGISTER FOR THESE WEBINARS

Strategies for Deploying Innovative Solutions for Perimeter Security


Natural History vs. Registry Studies in Rare Disease


The FDA Guidance on the Assessment of Abuse Potential of Drug – A Critical Review


Combination Product Regulatory Requirement Complexities and the Impact of the 21st Century Cures Act


Copyright © 2016-2017 Honeycomb Worldwide Inc.