Upcoming Webinars Archived Webinars Training Vitals Host A Webinar About Get Updates Contact

Gluten-Free Diet Does Not Provide Benefit for All Children with Celiac Disease

XTALKS VITALS NEWS

Celiac

According to the study authors, symptoms and results from lab tests are not predictive of which patients will experience persistent celiac enteropathy.

Share this!

November 21, 2016 | by Sarah Hand, M.Sc.

A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, has found that almost 20 percent of children with celiac disease who are on a gluten-free diet, still show intestinal abnormalities a year after beginning treatment. According to the study authors, symptoms and results from lab tests are not predictive of which patients will experience persistent celiac enteropathy.

“These findings suggest that a revisitation of monitoring and management criteria of celiac disease in childhood,” said Dr. Maureen Leonard of Mass General Hospital for Children in Boston. The researchers completed their study by analyzing the medical records belonging to 103 children with celiac disease.

Patients with celiac disease experience intestinal damage when they consume gluten, which is found in wheat along with other cereal grains. Elimination of this allergenic protein is the primary treatment for celiac disease.

The children followed in the study had been placed on a gluten-free diet for an average of 2.4 years. Approximately 90 percent of the patients displayed excellent adherence to their gluten-free diet.



To assess what affect the diet had on the patients’ intestinal health, the children underwent biopsy and endoscopy at least twice during the study period: at the point of disease diagnosis and after one year on a gluten-free diet. The biopsies were conducted to investigate new and persistent symptoms, or in response to abnormal test results.

The study was specifically looking for patients with gluten-induced damage to intestinal cells, which was persistent despite adherence to a gluten-free diet. Laboratory tests are the most commonly-applied diagnostic tool to assess healing in the clinical setting, compared to biopsy and endoscopy.

The researchers found that 29 percent of children showed persistent celiac enteropathy, based on biopsy results. What’s more, this enteropathy could not be predicted based on symptoms or lab tests alone.

“While the long-term effects are not known, persistent enteropathy may predispose pediatric patients with celiac disease to future complications and suboptimal growth,” said Leonard. “These findings suggest the need not only for a baseline endoscopy to confirm the diagnosis of celiac disease but also consideration of a repeat biopsy to evaluate for remission.”


Keywords: Gluten-Free, Celiac, Biopsy


| NEXT ARTICLE | MORE NEWS | BLOGS | VIDEOS | POLLS & QUIZZES | WEBINARS |

Share this with your colleagues!

MORE NEWS
New Self-Injectable Form of Lupus Drug Approved by the FDA

July 25, 2017 - Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) will now have the option to self-inject their medication thanks to the FDA approval of GSK’s reformulated lupus drug, Benlysta (belimumab).

Featured In: Biotech News


Canadian Chicken Farmers to Further Reduce Use of Antibiotics

July 24, 2017 - The Chicken Farmers of Canada, a national group dedicated to supporting poultry farmers and helping them meet consumer demand for chicken, has announced their strategy for eliminating the use of certain antimicrobials in meat production.

Featured In: Food News


Neonatal MRI Medical Device Approved by the FDA

July 24, 2017 - Medical device maker Aspect Imaging has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its Embrace Neonatal MRI System.

Featured In: Medical Device News


LEAVE A COMMENT
 
  
THE XTALKS VITALS INDUSTRY BLOG

Top 5 Most Impactful Tweets from #AAIC17

REGISTER FOR THESE WEBINARS

Into the Great Wide Open: PTC’s Transformation & Global Journey to Bring Patients a First Ever Rare Disease Therapy


EDC and eSource: Combined for Better Data and Faster Insights


Using Model Reduction to Bridge the Quality Systems Pharmacology-Pharmacometrics Divide


How to Maximize Your Non-GLP Toxicology Studies: A Guide for Optimal Design and Methodology


Copyright © 2016-2017 Honeycomb Worldwide Inc.