Upcoming Webinars Archived Webinars Training Vitals Host A Webinar About Get Updates Contact

Despite Cleaning, Bacterial Biofilms Remain Within Colonoscopes

XTALKS VITALS NEWS

Colonoscope

According to the authors of the study – which was published in the American Journal of Infection Control – microscopic scratches and dents in these medical devices can allow for the growth of bacterial biofilms.

Share this!

February 2, 2017 | by Sarah Hand, M.Sc.

Colonoscopes and other gastrointestinal devices are rigorously cleaned between procedures, however a new study has found that these practices may not be enough to remove contaminants such as bacteria and other biological material. According to the authors of the study – which was published in the American Journal of Infection Control – microscopic scratches and dents in these medical devices can allow for the growth of bacterial biofilms.

The researchers studied scopes manufactured by Japanese medical device maker, Olympus Corp., over a seven-month period. These gastroscopes and colonoscopies were routinely disinfected following current guidelines, however 12 of the 20 scopes in use tested positive for bacterial growth.

What’s more, 17 of the scopes were found to have significant scratches and dents, leading them to be returned to Olympus for repair. These defects not only allow for the multiplication of bacteria, but also cause blood and debris to accumulate.



“Physicians, other caregivers, hospitals and regulators should be paying keen attention to this issue, as patients have a right to assume that clean instruments are being used on them,” said Cori Ofstead, an epidemiologist in St. Paul, Minnesota, and the first author of the study.

In recent years, gastrointestinal scopes have been linked to a number of cases of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, some of which were fatal. While contaminated duodenoscopes have been implicated in the most of these cases of illness, the current study suggests users of other types of scopes may also be at risk.

Unlike other studies however, the bacterial species identified on the scopes by Ofstead and his colleagues were not drug-resistant. Still the study suggests that all health centers should be more vigilant when it comes to scope maintenance.

“The FDA continues to actively monitor challenges associated with reprocessing reusable medical devices and to look for ways to reduce the risk of infection with reprocessed endoscopes,” said Deborah Kotz, a spokeswoman from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The agency has also encouraged hospitals to stop using any scopes that show signs of damage.


Keywords: Biofilm, Colonoscope, Medical Device


| NEXT ARTICLE | MORE NEWS | BLOGS | VIDEOS | POLLS & QUIZZES | WEBINARS |

Share this with your colleagues!

MORE NEWS
Lavazza Acquires Controlling Stake in Canada’s Kicking Horse Coffee

May 26, 2017 - Italian coffee company Lavazza, has secured an 80 percent equity stake in Canadian organic and fair-trade coffee company Kicking Horse Coffee, in a deal worth CAD$215 million.

Featured In: Food News


FDA First: Keytruda Approved for Cancer Treatment Based on Biomarker Alone

May 25, 2017 - For the first time, the FDA has approved a cancer treatment for solid tumors based on the presence of a biomarker, as opposed to specifying a tissue of origin.

Featured In: Biotech News


One Year of Medically Assisted Dying in Canada

May 25, 2017 - In June of 2016, the federal government of Canada passed legislation to legalize medically assisted dying.

Featured In: Life Science News


LEAVE A COMMENT
 
  
THE XTALKS VITALS INDUSTRY BLOG

Top 5 Most Impactful Tweets in Life Sciences During the Last Week

REGISTER FOR THESE WEBINARS

EU IVD Regulation: Top Five Changes for Medical Device Manufacturers to Consider


Thermal Processing Systems for the Food Industry: A Guide to Selecting Thermal Equipment and Technology


Rare Disease & Orphan Drug Development: Cost-Efficient Trial Design to Minimize Cash Burn


eTMF Workflows: Active eTMF to Improve the Quality of Clinical Trials


Copyright © 2016-2017 Honeycomb Worldwide Inc.