Upcoming Webinars Archived Webinars Training Vitals Host A Webinar About Get Updates Contact

Alzheimer’s Diagnosis In Men Linked To Loss Of Y Chromosome

XTALKS VITALS NEWS

Alzheimer's

The researchers believe that the loss of Y could be a biomarker for Alzheimer’s, allowing physicians to diagnose the disease in its early stages.

Share this!

May 25, 2016 | by Sarah Massey, M.Sc.

A global research team has shown that men whose red blood cells are lacking a Y chromosome – a phenomenon known as loss of Y – may be more susceptible to developing Alzheimer’s. The researchers believe that the loss of Y could be a biomarker for Alzheimer’s, allowing physicians to diagnose the disease in its early stages.

The Y chromosome contains the genetic information necessary for many of the factors that make an individual physiologically male – including development of the testes - but in some men, their Y chromosome begins to degenerate as they age. As men tend to live shorter lives compared to women, and men are more likely to develop non-sex-linked cancers, this loss of Y may explain the differences in mortality between the sexes.

In order to investigate the potential link between loss of Y and Alzheimer’s, Professors Lars Forsberg and Jan Dumanski, from the Department of Immunology, Genetics, and Pathology at Uppsala University, Sweden, set up a collaboration with researchers in the UK, France, the US and Canada. Forsberg’s previous research interests included determining what effects the loss of the Y chromosome had on cancer development and progression.

“The idea for this research project came to me when I was writing our first paper on the relationship between loss of Y and the development of non-blood cancers,” said Forsberg. “In thinking about the process known as immunosurveillance - the body's ability to fight disease development throughout life - I found that it had been well studied in Alzheimer's disease, and hence it occurred to me that loss of Y might be involved in this disease too.”



The researchers studied the prevalence of Y chromosomes in the red blood cells of 3,300 men aged 37 to 96. Approximately 17 percent of the men showed a loss of Y in a minimum of 10 percent of their red blood cells.

The researchers found that elderly men more commonly displayed loss of Y. While the study contained a wide age range, the average age for study participants was 73.

Individuals with a pre-existing Alzheimer’s diagnosis were more likely to have a loss of Y. Interestingly, those identified as having a loss of Y were more likely to develop Alzheimer’s in the follow-up period after the study.

The researchers suggest that the degraded Y chromosome may lower the red blood cell’s ability to function during an immune response. Regardless, the researchers say that loss of Y could act as a biomarker to encourage physicians to begin neurological testing for Alzheimer’s.

More than 5 million people suffer from Alzheimer’s in the US alone; this number is expected to rise to 14 million by 2050.


Keywords: Alzheimer's, Cancer, Biomarker


| NEXT ARTICLE | MORE NEWS | BLOGS | VIDEOS | POLLS & QUIZZES | WEBINARS |

Share this with your colleagues!

MORE NEWS
Early Alzheimer’s Patients May See Benefit from Anti-Epilepsy Drug

June 27, 2017 - While the processes behind Alzheimer’s disease development aren’t fully understood, recent research has suggested that some cognitive decline could be caused by seizure-like activity in the brains of patients.

Featured In: Clinical Trials News


First Human Colon Organoids Grown in Lab

June 26, 2017 - Using human pluripotent stem cells, researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have developed colon-like organoids that can be transplanted into mice.

Featured In: Life Science News


Could Genetic Markers Help Identify Patients at Risk of Opioid Overdose?

June 26, 2017 - Researchers at Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands have identified 10 genes which may help healthcare providers predict which patients could respond poorly to opioid medications.

Featured In: Drug Safety News


LEAVE A COMMENT
 
  
THE XTALKS VITALS INDUSTRY BLOG

Top 5 Most Impactful Tweets in Drug Development During the Last Week

REGISTER FOR THESE WEBINARS

Serialized? Yes. But are Products Still Being Diverted?


Quantitative Protein Profiling in FFPE to Characterize Toxicities Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors


Are You Choosing the Right Model? A Guide to Selecting Your Next Immuno-Oncology Model


Imaging-based Subtypes of Pancreatic Cancer


Copyright © 2016-2017 Honeycomb Worldwide Inc.